Images of War Series – Now Available as eBooks!

Images-of-War

We’re excited to announce that the titles in Pen and Sword’s fascinating series Images of War are now available as eBooks for download from all major retail sites!

The Images of War series contains titles that are filled with rare and contemporary images, accompanied with informative captions and text. Most of the titles in this series focus on campaigns and formations during the Second World War.

To read more about the featured Images of War titles and to see the full list of available titles, continue below:

Auschwitz Death Camp
Ian Baxter

The concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau was the site of the single largest mass murder in history. Over one million mainly Jewish men, women, and children were murdered in its gas chambers. Countless more died as a result of disease and starvation. ‘Auschwitz Death Camp’ is a chilling pictorial record of this infamous establishment. Using some 250 photographs together with detailed captions and accompanying text, it describes how Auschwitz evolved from a brutal labor camp at the beginning of the war into what was literally a factory of death. The images how people lived, worked and died at Auschwitz.

Hitler’s Panzers
Ian Baxter

Using previously unpublished photographs, many of which have come from the albums of individuals who took part in the war, Hitler’s Panzers presents a unique visual account of Germany at arms.

The book analyses the development of the Panzer and shows how it became Hitler’s supreme weapon. It describes how the Germans carefully built up their assault forces utilizing all available reserves and resources and making them into effective killing machine. From the Panzerkampfwagen.1 to the most powerful tank of the Second World War, the Jagdtiger, the volume depicts how these machines were adapted and up-gunned to face the ever-increasing enemy threat.

Kalashnikov in Combat
Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
Anthony Tucker-Jones

made. This weapon has transcended its Soviet designer and country of origin to become the most prolifically produced and iconic weapon in the world – and it has become a brand that has been used to sell everything from T-shirts to vodka.

Although it first appeared in the late 1940s, it did not make its decisive presence felt on the battlefield until the Vietnam War when China supplied it to the Vietnamese communists. The weapon’s durability became a legend. Since then it has been employed in practically every conflict around the globe, and it is seen as the symbol of the wars of national liberation. Probably its most celebrated moment came in the hands of the mujahideen fighting to oust the Soviets from Afghanistan.

American Expeditionary Force
France 1917-1918
Jack Holroyd

When the United States entered the war in April 1917 the belligerents were approaching exhaustion. It had been hoped by the Generals in both Britain and France that untold numbers of fresh troops would be assimilated into their respective commands. However, this idea was firmly resisted, America would field its own army alongside the Allies – it would have its own section on the front line. Those with concerns that the untried divisions under General Pershing would fair badly against the seasoned German military machine were soon reassured as impressive victories were won by the newcomers.

Final Days of the Reich
Ian Baxter

The Final Days of the Reich is the latest in the popular Images of War series by Ian Baxter. Drawing on rare and previously unpublished photographs accompanied by in-depth captions and text, this book is a compelling account of the final weeks of the Nazis’ struggle for survival against overwhelming odds. Each photograph fully captures the tension, turmoil and tragedy of those last, terrible days of war as Wehmacht, Waffen SS, Luftwaffe, Hitlerjungend, Volkssturm and other units, some of which where comprised of barely trained conscripts, fought out their last battles.

Also available from the Images of War Series:

  • SS-Totenkopf France 1940
  • 617 Dambuster Squadron at War
  • American Expeditionary Force: France 1917-1918
  • Armoured Warfare in the North African Campaign
  • Armoured Warfare in the Battle for Normandy
  • Armoured Warfare on the Eastern Front
  • Battle of Kursk 1943
  • Blitzkrieg in the West
  • Blitzkrieg Poland
  • Blitzkrieg Russia
  • British Tanks: The Second World War
  • British Tanks: 1945 to the Present Dat
  • Carnage: The German Front in World War One
  • Fallschirmjager: Elite German Paratroops in World War II
  • Flanders 1915: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
  • The Germans in Flanders 1915-1916
  • German Guns of the Third Reich
  • German Halftracks at War 1939-1945
  • Germans on the Somme
  • Hitler’s Boy Soldiers: The Hitler Jugend Story
  • Hitler’s Defeat on the Easter Front
  • Hitler’s Headquarters 1939-1945
  • Hitler’s Mountain Troops 1939-1945
  • Hitler’s Tank Killer: Sturmgeschutz at War
  • Korea: Ground War from Both Sides
  • Leningrad: Hero City
  • Luftwaffe Flak and Field Divisions 1939-1945
  • Luftwaffe in World War II
  • Malta GC: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
  • Motorcycles at War: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
  • Norwich Blitz
  • Panzer-Division at War 1939-1945
  • Panzer IV at War 1989-1945
  • Red Army ar War: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
  • Retreat to Berline
  • Rommel’s Army in the Desert
  • The Russian Revolution: World War to Civil War
  • Sherman Tank
  • Special Forces Vehicles
  • Stalingrad: Victory on the Volga
  • The U-Boat War
  • Tirpitz: The First Voyage
  • U-Boats at War in World War I and World War II
  • Victory in the Pacific
  • Winston Churchill
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