SALE: Select Pen & Sword eBooks are now $1.21

Now through January 31, 2017, you can purchase over 25 Pen & Sword eBooks for just $1.21 each! These must-read titles cover subjects like World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and more. Don’t miss your chance to add them to your library or give them as a holiday gift this season.

Keep reading to see some of the titles featured in this deal, or click here to see the full selection of Pen & Sword eBooks on sale for $1.21 on our website. 


Hitler versus Stalin: The Eastern Front 1941-1942 (Images of War)

iow-hitler-vs-stalin-eastern-frontThe third volume in Nik Cornish’s photographic history of the Second World War on the Eastern Front records in vivid visual detail the sequence of Red Army offensives that pushed the Wehrmacht back across Russia after the failure of the Operation Citadel, the German attack at Kursk. Previously unpublished images show the epic scale of the build-up to the Kursk battle and the enormous cost in terms of lives and material of the battle itself. They also show that the military initiative was now firmly in Soviet hands, for the balance of power on the Eastern Front had shifted and the Germans were on the defensive and in retreat.

Subsequent chapters chronicle the hard-fought and bloody German withdrawal across western Russia and the Ukraine, recording the Red Army’s liberation of occupied Soviet territory. Not only do the photographs track the sequence of events on the ground, they also show the equipment and the weapons used by both sides, the living conditions experienced by the troops and the devastation the war left in its wake.

$14.97 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

A Marine at Gallipoli and on the Western Front

a-marine-at-gallipoliHarry Askin was 22 when he enlisted at Nottingham in September 1914 and was sent to train with the Royal Marines at Portsmouth.

He set sail with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force in late February 1915. On 25 April he was towed ashore to Gallipoli. So began a nine month ordeal of constant fighting and shelling on that bare and desperate Peninsula.

In this diary he captures the atmosphere of danger and death, blazing heat in summer and rain and cold at other times. The smell of dead bodies was everywhere and while the fortitude of the troops was astonishing, at times confusion and panic prevailed. Harry was wounded twice in one day but the surgeon removed the bullet and he returned to the firing line.

Harry was among the last to withdraw and his reward was to be sent to the Western Front. Again he was wounded. This is a stirring memoir which paints a vivid picture of the horrors of war.

$22.99 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

Cold War Jet Combat

cold-war-jet-combatRecounted here are nine of the earliest wars involving jet aircraft. From the Korean War and beyond, it comprises a wealth of gripping insight. Many of the jet-to-jet dogfights that spanned these jet-powered wars are enlivened to thrilling effect, including those engaged in during the two Indo-Pak Wars of 1965 and 1971.

Operation ‘Musketeer’ (1956), mounted when RAF and French Air Force bombers and fighter-bombers attacked airfields and other targets in Egypt (after President Nasser had nationalized the Suez Canal), is also covered in this gripping narrative. The Falklands Campaign is also covered, as is the Vietnam War.

In another chapter, QRA operations around the British Isles are put under the microscope as RAF Phantoms, Lightnings, Tornadoes and Typhoon Eurofighters on Quick Reaction Alert are described, patrolling international air space and maintaining a constant vigil as Soviet ‘Bears’ continued to test NATO defenses.

All in all, this is a compelling, well-researched and highly informative study of a particularly dynamic era in aviation history.

$23.97 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

The Few: Fight for the Skies (Images of War)

iow-the-fewIn this new pictorial history from Philip Kaplan, the perspectives of both RAF and Luftwaffe airmen are considered within the wider context of one of the most iconic and pivotal conflicts of modern history.

The Blitz, primarily the bombing of London and the major cities of Britain by the German Air Force, lasted for fifty-seven nights from September 1940 into May 1941. Life under the bombing; the perspectives of German and British airmen; the experience of sheltering in the London Underground; firsthand accounts of the horror by survivors left behind; all these voices are consolidated to great effect, providing a suitable commentary to the rare archive photography on display.

Accounts and photographs of some of the most notable participants caught up in the proceedings include; Al Deere, Geoffrey Page, Brian Kingcome, Peter Townsend, Bob Doe and Ginger Lacey.

$13.99 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

Sacrifice, Captivity & Escape

sacrifice-captivity-escapeSacrifice, Captivity and Escape is an exceptional story. Peter Jackson was young and recently married when he was drafted into the army at the start of World War II. He had no wish to be there but like most of his generation he was given no choice.

Peter arrived in Singapore just as the city was being evacuated and within days he was a prisoner of the Imperial Japanese Army. Peter was one of the very few to survive the hardship, illnesses and brutality that followed. Like so many he was forced to work for the Japanese, first in Singapore and then on the infamous Thai-Burma railway. While there, remarkably, he escaped with seven other soldiers and, when recaptured, he was treated harshly.

His memoir brings alive the characters of his comrades and also of the Japanese who he encountered. Some of the Japanese treated their prisoners humanely and Peter was able to form a relationship with them but others were sadistic psychopaths.

But throughout his memoir there is a sense of hopefulness that, as young men, they would survive and get back to their homes; this was despite the despair many of them felt at losing four years of their lives as prisoners.

$8.99 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

Prisoner of the Gestapo

prisoner-of-the-gestapoTom Firth was born in Japan where his English father and Polish mother were living. He begins by describing his unusual childhood and the devastating Yokohama earthquake in 1923. In 1930 the family settled in Warsaw, Poland. However they became split up when Poland became overrun by the Nazis and the Russians in 1939. Whilst his father and older brother were in England, Tom found himself trapped in the Russian-occupied part of the country and, after several agonizing months, eventually made his way to Warsaw where his mother had managed to survive the bombing of the city. He vividly describes life under both regimes, as well as the cat-and-mouse game his mother was forced to play with the Gestapo in order to avoid arrest. Later, both became deeply involved with the sheltering of escaped British prisoners of war and it was this activity which led to his capture and imprisonment in a jail in Krakow. Miraculously released after eighteen months captivity, largely due to his command of the Polish language, he vowed to escape to Britain at all cost.

Later in the war and after many harrowing experiences he succeeded in getting through to the Red Army, but was again faced with hostility, suspicion and imprisonment. Held for several months in primitive conditions, he, along with two British companions was finally taken to Moscow and handed over to the British Military Mission there. Arriving in Scotland with a convoy of supply ships late in December 1944, he had the galling experience of spending a night in Brixton Prison. With nowhere to go he then began a frantic search for his father and brother, who were convinced that he was dead. His dream came true, but even after the ending of hostilities and later in time, tragedy struck with the news of his mother’s arrest by the Polish Communist authorities. Sentenced to death for alleged espionage, she spent several years in prison, being freed in a Government amnesty and arriving in England in 1956.

$10.99 $1.21 Purchase your copy here

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